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Thread: Corbyn - never fofget

  1. #31

    Re: Corbyn - never fofget

    Is 'never fofget' linked to 'covfefe'?

  2. #32

    Re: Corbyn - never fofget

    Quote Originally Posted by Wales-Bales View Post
    What's a Laugh-out-loud-shevik?
    Did you read the original article? It was the smart arse writer's attempt to portray Corbyn's followers on social media as people who laugh whenever an act of political violence is perpetrated on people or groups they don't like or approve.

  3. #33

    Re: Corbyn - never fofget

    Quote Originally Posted by Elwood Blues View Post
    Yes the final bit of the penultimate paragraph does over egg the pudding a bit but the rest of it makes sense.

    And even though it is a well worn point it is still valid.


    There are so many alive today who don't realise that 30 years ago people were as concerned about the IRA then as they are of ISIL today. And many who were don't seem to remember.

    Time is a great healer but some things should never be forgotten.
    I'm not so sure about that - it's pretty obvious that not all of the article was pasted into the OP.

    Also, although I accept that the following will probably lead to me being accused of being an IRA apologist, there are two sides to the argument, as applied to Ireland, outlined in the article. Of course, the Brighton bombing was one of a series of outrages perpetrated by the IRA which cannot, and should never be, condoned, but the inference of the article appears to be that the murder of politicians and/or their family members is somehow worse than all of the other killings carried out, by both sides, in that period lasting from the sixties through to the nineties. I lived through that time and can remember, for example, Bloody Sunday which would, surely, have made a huge impression on many young Catholics in Northern Ireland at that time.

    Thirteen years after the Brighton bombing came the Good Friday Agreement which was supported on all sides of the political spectrum - should those who enabled the likes of Gerry Adams and Martin McGuiness to play a part in the governing of Northern Ireland by voting for the agreement also be condemned? Jeremy Corbyn voted in favour of the Good Friday Agreement and I believe that articles like this one

    https://www.channel4.com/news/factch...rthern-ireland

    offer a more genuine analysis of his attitude towards that country than the one portrayed in the article.

    In my opinion, Jeremy Corbyn's weakness when it comes to antisemitism and Brexit raise legitimate questions about his worthiness to become Prime Minister, but I don't think what he said and did about Northern Ireland thirty years and more ago (a time when the political landscape in that area was completely different to what it is now) should preclude him from getting the job.

  4. #34

    Re: Corbyn - never fofget

    Quote Originally Posted by the other bob wilson View Post
    I'm not so sure about that - it's pretty obvious that not all of the article was pasted into the OP.

    Also, although I accept that the following will probably lead to me being accused of being an IRA apologist, there are two sides to the argument, as applied to Ireland, outlined in the article. Of course, the Brighton bombing was one of a series of outrages perpetrated by the IRA which cannot, and should never be, condoned, but the inference of the article appears to be that the murder of politicians and/or their family members is somehow worse than all of the other killings carried out, by both sides, in that period lasting from the sixties through to the nineties. I lived through that time and can remember, for example, Bloody Sunday which would, surely, have made a huge impression on many young Catholics in Northern Ireland at that time.

    Thirteen years after the Brighton bombing came the Good Friday Agreement which was supported on all sides of the political spectrum - should those who enabled the likes of Gerry Adams and Martin McGuiness to play a part in the governing of Northern Ireland by voting for the agreement also be condemned? Jeremy Corbyn voted in favour of the Good Friday Agreement and I believe that articles like this one

    https://www.channel4.com/news/factch...rthern-ireland

    offer a more genuine analysis of his attitude towards that country than the one portrayed in the article.

    In my opinion, Jeremy Corbyn's weakness when it comes to antisemitism and Brexit raise legitimate questions about his worthiness to become Prime Minister, but I don't think what he said and did about Northern Ireland thirty years and more ago (a time when the political landscape in that area was completely different to what it is now) should preclude him from getting the job.
    Sorry cant agree with you on this one ,and he won't have changed his view either ,this is about suitability and security and the fact folk died .

    """ [I]Jeremy Corbyn was arrested in 1986 taking part in a protest by IRA sympathisers to “show solidarity” with accused terrorists including the Brighton bomber, a Sunday Times investigation reveals.

    Corbyn joined a picket outside the Old Bailey to oppose the “show trial” of a group including Patrick Magee, who was subsequently convicted of murdering five people at the 1984 Tory party conference.

    Magee was also convicted with the other defendants of planning a massive bombing campaign in London and seaside resorts.

    Emily Thornberry, the shadow foreign secretary, defended her leader this morning for speaking out openly at the time, adding that Mr Corbyn’s position was “not having open support for the IRA”.""

    And has he not since attended some strange events, and remembrances ?

  5. #35

    Re: Corbyn - never fofget

    Quote Originally Posted by life on mars View Post
    Sorry cant agree with you on this one ,and he won't have changed his view either ,this is about suitability and security and the fact folk died .

    """ [I]Jeremy Corbyn was arrested in 1986 taking part in a protest by IRA sympathisers to “show solidarity” with accused terrorists including the Brighton bomber, a Sunday Times investigation reveals.

    Corbyn joined a picket outside the Old Bailey to oppose the “show trial” of a group including Patrick Magee, who was subsequently convicted of murdering five people at the 1984 Tory party conference.

    Magee was also convicted with the other defendants of planning a massive bombing campaign in London and seaside resorts.

    Emily Thornberry, the shadow foreign secretary, defended her leader this morning for speaking out openly at the time, adding that Mr Corbyn’s position was “not having open support for the IRA”.""

    And has he not since attended some strange events, and remembrances ?
    Cleverly written to imply that Corbyn was present to 'show solidarity' with accused terrorists which is an obvious rewriting of history. The Troops out Movement didn't believe Patrick Magee was going to get a fair trial, Corbyn attended to protest against a trial for show. Are you in favour of show trials or do you think the law should be followed to the letter in all instances (even under the most emotive of circumstances)?

  6. #36

    Re: Corbyn - never fofget

    Quote Originally Posted by the other bob wilson View Post
    I'm not so sure about that - it's pretty obvious that not all of the article was pasted into the OP.

    Also, although I accept that the following will probably lead to me being accused of being an IRA apologist, there are two sides to the argument, as applied to Ireland, outlined in the article. Of course, the Brighton bombing was one of a series of outrages perpetrated by the IRA which cannot, and should never be, condoned, but the inference of the article appears to be that the murder of politicians and/or their family members is somehow worse than all of the other killings carried out, by both sides, in that period lasting from the sixties through to the nineties. I lived through that time and can remember, for example, Bloody Sunday which would, surely, have made a huge impression on many young Catholics in Northern Ireland at that time.

    Thirteen years after the Brighton bombing came the Good Friday Agreement which was supported on all sides of the political spectrum - should those who enabled the likes of Gerry Adams and Martin McGuiness to play a part in the governing of Northern Ireland by voting for the agreement also be condemned? Jeremy Corbyn voted in favour of the Good Friday Agreement and I believe that articles like this one

    https://www.channel4.com/news/factch...rthern-ireland

    offer a more genuine analysis of his attitude towards that country than the one portrayed in the article.

    In my opinion, Jeremy Corbyn's weakness when it comes to antisemitism and Brexit raise legitimate questions about his worthiness to become Prime Minister, but I don't think what he said and did about Northern Ireland thirty years and more ago (a time when the political landscape in that area was completely different to what it is now) should preclude him from getting the job.
    It is this naivety that sends me loopy on this board. Show me a PM or leading politician who doesn't have a blot on their copybook when hindsight is applied to their decisions. Maggie was besties with a mass muderer, Cameron directly helped jihadis take over libya and Blair inadvertently did the same in Iraq - both managed to destabilise entire regions in a matter of months - we should never fofget these things either. Hindsight applied to Corbyn seems to stick, Hindsight applied to May's ghastly record against minorities whilst in the home office and against the most vulnerable as PM doesn't seem to.

    Yes but lets get another 'centralist' as LOM says because they don't do bad things (unless you count mindless decisions that go some way to destroying the world as bad).

  7. #37

    Re: Corbyn - never fofget

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Cartman View Post
    It is this naivety that sends me loopy on this board. Show me a PM or leading politician who doesn't have a blot on their copybook when hindsight is applied to their decisions. Maggie was besties with a mass muderer, Cameron directly helped jihadis take over libya and Blair inadvertently did the same in Iraq - both managed to destabilise entire regions in a matter of months - we should never fofget these things either. Hindsight applied to Corbyn seems to stick, Hindsight applied to May's ghastly record against minorities whilst in the home office and against the most vulnerable as PM doesn't seem to.

    Yes but lets get another 'centralist' as LOM says because they don't do bad things (unless you count mindless decisions that go some way to destroying the world as bad).
    Maybe they are preparing the ground for another referendum or a snap election? When you see these smears and hit pieces, you know something is lurking around the corner.

  8. #38

    Re: Corbyn - never fofget

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Cartman View Post
    It is this naivety that sends me loopy on this board. Show me a PM or leading politician who doesn't have a blot on their copybook when hindsight is applied to their decisions. Maggie was besties with a mass muderer, Cameron directly helped jihadis take over libya and Blair inadvertently did the same in Iraq - both managed to destabilise entire regions in a matter of months - we should never fofget these things either. Hindsight applied to Corbyn seems to stick, Hindsight applied to May's ghastly record against minorities whilst in the home office and against the most vulnerable as PM doesn't seem to.

    Yes but lets get another 'centralist' as LOM says because they don't do bad things (unless you count mindless decisions that go some way to destroying the world as bad).
    The Spectator article referred to in the original post refers to Corbyn meeting Sinn Fein representatives shortly after the Brighton Bombing when he knew Sinn Fein was the political wing of the IRA who were responsible for the bombing.

    Where does hindsight come into it?

  9. #39

    Re: Corbyn - never fofget

    Quote Originally Posted by Elwood Blues View Post
    The Spectator article referred to in the original post refers to Corbyn meeting Sinn Fein representatives shortly after the Brighton Bombing when he knew Sinn Fein was the political wing of the IRA who were responsible for the bombing.

    Where does hindsight come into it?
    The state has aways met with our enemies through backchannels, so what's the difference? How are you supposed to find common ground and possible solutions if you don't talk to people?

  10. #40

    Re: Corbyn - never fofget

    Quote Originally Posted by Elwood Blues View Post
    The Spectator article referred to in the original post refers to Corbyn meeting Sinn Fein representatives shortly after the Brighton Bombing when he knew Sinn Fein was the political wing of the IRA who were responsible for the bombing.

    Where does hindsight come into it?
    It feels like you are dodging the question on EU bullying in the other thread.

    Hindsight doesn't come into that at all. As far as I am aware it was roundly condemned at the time.

  11. #41

    Re: Corbyn - never fofget

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Cartman View Post
    It feels like you are dodging the question on EU bullying in the other thread.

    Hindsight doesn't come into that at all. As far as I am aware it was roundly condemned at the time.
    Then how was "hindsight applied to Corbyn appears to stick" relevant to this thread

    And I am not dodging your question. I did in fact as you well know give you an example of EU bullying (over the money we are going to have to pay to leave)but it was apparently too long ago fot you.

    Just can't be bothered to respond again to that thread at present. Suffering from Brexit overload.

  12. #42

    Re: Corbyn - never fofget

    Quote Originally Posted by Elwood Blues View Post
    Then how was "hindsight applied to Corbyn appears to stick" relevant to this thread

    And I am not dodging your question. I did in fact as you well know give you an example of EU bullying (over the money we are going to have to pay to leave)but it was apparently too long ago fot you.

    Just can't be bothered to respond again to that thread at present. Suffering from Brexit overload.
    It was relevant to what LOM posted, I replied to him.

    Asking for someone to pay for their commitments isn't bullying and logically you cant discuss the future without sorting out the present. I don't understand how anybody could see that as bullying if I am honest.

  13. #43

    Re: Corbyn - never fofget

    It's all down to loyalty for me ,theres lots of stuff I disagree with,and yes leaders past and present have applied wrong decesions ,in the main though they have been applied in a protective way , albeit in someways wrong .

    My concerns with Jeremy are he doesn't actually like the UK ,the West, and it's decesions ,his associations I feel are not in our best interest or becoming of a leader of this country .

  14. #44

    Re: Corbyn - never fofget

    Quote Originally Posted by life on mars View Post
    It's all down to loyalty for me ,theres lots of stuff I disagree with,and yes leaders past and present have applied wrong decesions ,in the main though they have been applied in a protective way , albeit in someways wrong .

    My concerns with Jeremy are he doesn't actually like the UK ,the West, and it's decesions ,his associations I feel are not in our best interest or becoming of a leader of this country .
    That is an acceptable opinion to hold but one that is impossible to quantify or argue against really.

    Does corbyn hate the UK? He definitely wants it to change but so do most politicians.

    What Corbyn has struggled with is being able to hold a view without associating with every other person holding that view, your enemies enemy is not always your friend.

    He hasn't had a managed route to power so his career in politics before leadership has not been santised along the way like a Blair or Cameron was.

    I have no real affinity with Corbyn, I didn't know much about him before he became leader but now it just feels like him going sparks a move back to business friendly (ie business led) new labour and a complete abandonment of anything resembling a left wing party.

    When it was Cameron and Blair/brown, the guy on the street said 'they are all the same what is the point', now they are markedly different he says 'they are extremists, hard left and hard right'. It is frustrating to watch.

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