Click here for Cardiff City personalised gift shop
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 31 to 58 of 58

Thread: Family Tree / DNA

  1. #31

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Why are you looking for four bears? Most people can make do with one.

  2. #32

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by jamieccfc View Post
    What’s the rough cost to dig deep in your family tree?
    Impossible to answer.
    Are you talking doing it yourself or paying someone?
    If you do it yourself, you need access to Ancestry and FindMyPast - which are available at Cardiff libraries or a free trial. You may need to buy certs to be sure you are tracing the right line (£9.25 each). But there is a limit to what you can research from home and almost certainly you'll need to visit county record offices (and maybe the National Archives) - or pay them or a local researcher to do your research. I spent £25 recently buying microfiche from Suffolk to trace a line back three more generations after getting through a brick wall.
    A lot depends on how far you want to take it and how much you want to dig. It is amazing how much information lurks in dusty corners of archives. It's just a matter of knowing where and how to look - which is why using an experienced researcher might be considered.

  3. #33

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclops View Post
    Impossible to answer.
    Are you talking doing it yourself or paying someone?
    If you do it yourself, you need access to Ancestry and FindMyPast - which are available at Cardiff libraries or a free trial. You may need to buy certs to be sure you are tracing the right line (£9.25 each). But there is a limit to what you can research from home and almost certainly you'll need to visit county record offices (and maybe the National Archives) - or pay them or a local researcher to do your research. I spent £25 recently buying microfiche from Suffolk to trace a line back three more generations after getting through a brick wall.
    A lot depends on how far you want to take it and how much you want to dig. It is amazing how much information lurks in dusty corners of archives. It's just a matter of knowing where and how to look - which is why using an experienced researcher might be considered.
    If I ever wanted to do it i would have to get a pro as I would just give up after awhile, I’m sure my grandfather (fathers) has a family tree of sorts but not sure how far it goes back I think he put me off when mentioning our family was from the carrot crunching side of the world

  4. #34

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclops View Post
    You and your wife will know the details of course, but may I ask if you are sure she was adopted - and not fostered?
    Cyclops - yes, definitely adopted. It is a very long story which started with a request to the record office for a full copy of her birth certificate - previously she only had one of those short form type certificates. She was notified by letter that she was adopted and if she wanted to know more she was required to contact the adoption services department. This was so she could receive counseling to ensure she knew what she was getting into. She decided to go ahead and this opened up a totally unexpected scenario. I don't want to go into too much detail but she discovered she had numerous half brothers/sisters all of whom she has now met. Some were adopted and others were fostered and all have had widely different life experiences. Some knew of the existence of others, some no knowledge at all. It transpired for the first 3 years of her life my wife was kept in a children's home as her single mother did not want her (she gave her up for adoption immediately) and then was eventually adopted by the couple who she came to know as Mum and Dad.

    No-one in the family ever mentioned that she was adopted, the same went for her "brother". Quite a remarkable story all in all (there is a lot more!) which would make quite a good weepy film/book!

  5. #35

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by Gofer Blue View Post
    Quite a remarkable story all in all (there is a lot more!) which would make quite a good weepy film/book!
    Thanks for that detailed comment.
    One of the satisfying aspects of detailed family history research is that it gives a sense of being 'grounded', so I'm not sure how I'd react to being in your wife's situation. Could be most unsettling to say the least.

    I've got an odd situation in my own family re adoption. One of my ancestors was a powder monkey at Trafalgar and despite deserting from the Navy, he received a medal with a Trafalgar bar which according to newspaper reports he wore proudly until his death. I wondered what had happened to his medal as there's a direct line from him down to my mother. Recently, there's been a lot of publicity about an HBOS fraud case (https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...aces-jail.html). One of the guilty (who had a yacht called Powder Monkey) has my mother's maiden name. He had a blog in which he boasted of his family connections with my ancestor - even having his Trafalgar medal. He claims to be the grandson of my great uncle. But my mother told me years ago that he and his brother were adopted. I've searched the Births Registration Index exhaustively and can't find either of them there, so I'm pretty sure she was right.

  6. #36

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by Taunton Blue Genie View Post
    They may be family in one sense but not in a DNA sense - for the reasons I listed earlier in this thread.
    I'm aware of that. But as I've said earlier, I don't want to pay for a private company to own and use my most personal data as they wish. I mean, not even the police can retain your DNA if you're not a convicted criminal. Why would I give it away to a private company owned by a zealous religious movement.

  7. #37

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by alan_corneli View Post
    Did you know that everyone who joins Ancestry.com is automatically baptised into the Church of Latter Day Saints (the Mormons) "in absentia".

    I kid you not.
    Yes. It is part of their religious duty to research their ancestors in order to "seal" them into their religion.

  8. #38

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclops View Post
    Thanks for that detailed comment.
    One of the satisfying aspects of detailed family history research is that it gives a sense of being 'grounded', so I'm not sure how I'd react to being in your wife's situation. Could be most unsettling to say the least.

    I've got an odd situation in my own family re adoption. One of my ancestors was a powder monkey at Trafalgar and despite deserting from the Navy, he received a medal with a Trafalgar bar which according to newspaper reports he wore proudly until his death. I wondered what had happened to his medal as there's a direct line from him down to my mother. Recently, there's been a lot of publicity about an HBOS fraud case (https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...aces-jail.html). One of the guilty (who had a yacht called Powder Monkey) has my mother's maiden name. He had a blog in which he boasted of his family connections with my ancestor - even having his Trafalgar medal. He claims to be the grandson of my great uncle. But my mother told me years ago that he and his brother were adopted. I've searched the Births Registration Index exhaustively and can't find either of them there, so I'm pretty sure she was right.
    I've PM'd you.

  9. #39

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclops View Post
    Thanks for that detailed comment.
    One of the satisfying aspects of detailed family history research is that it gives a sense of being 'grounded', so I'm not sure how I'd react to being in your wife's situation. Could be most unsettling to say the least.

    I've got an odd situation in my own family re adoption. One of my ancestors was a powder monkey at Trafalgar and despite deserting from the Navy, he received a medal with a Trafalgar bar which according to newspaper reports he wore proudly until his death. I wondered what had happened to his medal as there's a direct line from him down to my mother. Recently, there's been a lot of publicity about an HBOS fraud case (https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...aces-jail.html). One of the guilty (who had a yacht called Powder Monkey) has my mother's maiden name. He had a blog in which he boasted of his family connections with my ancestor - even having his Trafalgar medal. He claims to be the grandson of my great uncle. But my mother told me years ago that he and his brother were adopted. I've searched the Births Registration Index exhaustively and can't find either of them there, so I'm pretty sure she was right.
    Uhm, Iím not sure what you can do in these circumstances as you only have quite a tenuous connection with this person. If Iíve got it right itís the grandson of your motherís uncle (your great uncle) you are talking about? In my wifeís case she was seeking information about herself of course, so relatively straightforward.

    A long shot: do you know the place of birth and date of birth of the man? You could then check the birth indexes and see who was born in the place on that day. There would only be a relatively small number of males born that day/place and maybe eliminate them one by one? The man you are tracking will disappear from the records as he takes on his adopted name, whereas the others will go on to adulthood, get married, maybe have childrenÖ.. a long laborious process. Even then that will only give you his birth-name which may not lead anywhere. I canít see any other way around it short of writing to the bloke in person (I assume heís in jail) or are there any other relatives that you know of that you could contact?

    When we started working on my family tree back in the late 1970ís we just happened to look up my wifeís details. We lived near London at that time so it was easy to go to St. Katherineís house and look her up in the indexes there. In those days the entries were hand written but her name was not listed? We just assumed that the omission was a clerical error and did not follow it up. Knowing what we know now, of course her name was there all the time but it was her birth-name!! The great irony is that we could have discovered she was adopted back then but the repercussions would have been significant as her parents were still alive at that time. Maybe it was meant to be the way things turned out

  10. #40

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by Gofer Blue View Post
    A long shot: do you know the place of birth and date of birth of the man? You could then check the birth indexes and see who was born in the place on that day. There would only be a relatively small number of males born that day/place and maybe eliminate them one by one? The man you are tracking will disappear from the records as he takes on his adopted name, whereas the others will go on to adulthood, get married, maybe have children….. a long laborious process. Even then that will only give you his birth-name which may not lead anywhere. I can’t see any other way around it short of writing to the bloke in person (I assume he’s in jail) or are there any other relatives that you know of that you could contact?
    I know the full names and ages of the two brothers and where they would have been born (if not adopted). Neither appear in the Birth Index. But I still have the note I made when Mum was talking about her family (long before the HBOS case) and with no prompt from me, she said the two brothers were adopted. She was 100% right on most things. He was using his adopted name when he married - I have the cert.

  11. #41

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    If anyone is following this saga - there is a Cardiff connection: https://www.ianfraser.org/ten-compan...f-david-mills/

  12. #42
    International Mrs Steve R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Barry
    Posts
    28,992
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by jamieccfc View Post
    If I ever wanted to do it i would have to get a pro as I would just give up after awhile, Iím sure my grandfather (fathers) has a family tree of sorts but not sure how far it goes back I think he put me off when mentioning our family was from the carrot crunching side of the world
    There is a great article in Family tree magazine (July 2017) on the benefits of using a professional researcher, it features my ancestors in the case study's so I guess I would say that () but it's a good read.

  13. #43

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs Steve R View Post
    There is a great article in Family tree magazine (July 2017) on the benefits of using a professional researcher, it features my ancestors in the case study's so I guess I would say that () but it's a good read.
    Maybe, but the writer has a badly-skewed view of the matter and seems intent on drumming up business for his personal benefit.

  14. #44
    International Mrs Steve R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Barry
    Posts
    28,992
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclops View Post
    Maybe, but the writer has a badly-skewed view of the matter and seems intent on drumming up business for his personal benefit.
    Not sure what to say to that as the writer is you there is no way I would ever have found the things you found, I could not even read the birth certificates

  15. #45
    International Mrs Steve R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Barry
    Posts
    28,992
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Here is the article, you might be able to zoom in and read it I think it's very good



  16. #46

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs Steve R View Post
    Not sure what to say to that as the writer is you there is no way I would ever have found the things you found, I could not even read the birth certificates
    Cyclops knows his stuff, that's for sure. Bloody good egg regarding these matters.

  17. #47

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs Steve R View Post
    Here is the article, you might be able to zoom in and read it I think it's very good
    Yesterday's chip paper.

  18. #48
    International Mrs Steve R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Barry
    Posts
    28,992
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclops View Post
    Yesterday's chip paper.
    Well that "chip paper" is going to be handed down to my kids with my family history books and a Henry Pyefinch telescope if I can ever afford one

  19. #49

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclops View Post
    I know the full names and ages of the two brothers and where they would have been born (if not adopted). Neither appear in the Birth Index. But I still have the note I made when Mum was talking about her family (long before the HBOS case) and with no prompt from me, she said the two brothers were adopted. She was 100% right on most things. He was using his adopted name when he married - I have the cert.
    Can I ask why you want to pursue this? Is it to do with the medal or just a matter of completing that branch of the family tree?

  20. #50
    International Mrs Steve R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Barry
    Posts
    28,992
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by Gofer Blue View Post
    Can I ask why you want to pursue this? Is it to do with the medal or just a matter of completing that branch of the family tree?
    If you knew him you wouldn't need to ask

  21. #51

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs Steve R View Post
    If you knew him you wouldn't need to ask
    OK, just curious. I've done a lot of work on my family tree but wouldn't really be interested in spending time on researching 2nd or 3rd cousins unless there was a very specific reason for doing so.

  22. #52

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by Gofer Blue View Post
    OK, just curious. I've done a lot of work on my family tree but wouldn't really be interested in spending time on researching 2nd or 3rd cousins unless there was a very specific reason for doing so.
    Yes, the further the spread, the less of an interest. I have however spoken to 5th 6th cousins in other parts of the world whilst crossing over our research, and have kept in touch with one in Australia through regular emails and xmas cards.

  23. #53
    International Mrs Steve R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Barry
    Posts
    28,992
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by Gofer Blue View Post
    OK, just curious. I've done a lot of work on my family tree but wouldn't really be interested in spending time on researching 2nd or 3rd cousins unless there was a very specific reason for doing so.
    I just meant he likes to get to bottom of things and usually does if it's possible

  24. #54

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Greetings CCMBers, I come to you via West Wales, Mid Wales, South Wales, the Valleys, the Marches and the Herefordshire border (by all of 100 yards).

    However, my Cardiff connections actually stem from County Durham, where I can trace my roots back to 1750, as a family of blacksmiths, miners and steel workers. My great grandfather moved from County Durham to Splott in around 1891 to work at the newly opened steel works,

  25. #55

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs Steve R View Post
    I just meant he likes to get to bottom of things and usually does if it's possible
    OK, fair enough.

  26. #56

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by Des Parrot View Post
    Greetings CCMBers, I come to you via West Wales, Mid Wales, South Wales, the Valleys, the Marches and the Herefordshire border (by all of 100 yards).

    However, my Cardiff connections actually stem from County Durham, where I can trace my roots back to 1750, as a family of blacksmiths, miners and steel workers. My great grandfather moved from County Durham to Splott in around 1891 to work at the newly opened steel works,
    A large percentage of Valley people are descendants of folk who came from all over the country to be part of the "coal Klondyke". My paternal great, great grandfather was an agricultural labourer from Wiltshire who came to Mountain Ash in the 1840's looking for work. Despite the dangers the mines offered steady employment whereas "Ag Labs" were often laid off over the winter months. My other great grandfather (on my grandmother's side of the family) was a copper miner from Devon, so he must have taken to coal mining quite easily.

  27. #57

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Tin and Copper mining were massive industries down in south west England. When work dried up there, loads of miners came over looking to use their skills in the coalfields.

    I believe that the development of the start of the heavy coal industry in south Wales pretty much coincided with the fall in the tin/copper industry in south west England.

    Swansea had a massive copper industry and their tin was exported around the world as was Rhondda coal.

    Port Talbot had a massive influx of workers from west Wales (Carmarthernshire) in the late 19th century and Aberavon RFC are know as the "Wizards" because they all wanted to chase the egg and associate themselves with Merlin who is supposed to be from that area.

    A lot of Irish immigrants came over to Cardigan and Pembrokeshire to escape starvation during the potatoe famine and eventually made their way east. Port Talbot town area still has a massive Irish ancestry mainly from navvies working on building the docks, and names such as o'Brien, Keogh, Kelly and Murphy are common.

    Cardiff is obviously visibly diverse, again due to historical opportunities with the docks.

    There was a programme on the BBC a year or two ago about immigration in Cardiff and I'm pretty sure that it claimed that Penarth Road in particular is the most culturally diverse street in the entire UK in terms of every neighbour had a completely different ancestry, e.g British, Somalian, Bengali, Chinese etc.

    I find it all very interesting.

  28. #58

    Re: Family Tree / DNA

    Quote Originally Posted by B. Oddie View Post
    Tin and Copper mining were massive industries down in south west England. When work dried up there, loads of miners came over looking to use their skills in the coalfields.
    I believe that the development of the start of the heavy coal industry in south Wales pretty much coincided with the fall in the tin/copper industry in south west England. I find it all very interesting.
    You'd enjoy reading King Copper: South Wales and the Copper Trade, 1584-1895 Ronald Rees (in Cardiff Library)
    He explains that it was cheaper to ship copper from Devon and Cornwall to South Wales because of the coal, limestone and water needed to refine copper ore

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •