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Thread: People using "Americanisms"

  1. #1

    People using "Americanisms"

    I'll give an example:

    "I'm looking forward to the new season of Line of Duty..."


  2. #2

    Re: People using "Americanisms"

    Quote Originally Posted by B. Oddie View Post
    I'll give an example:

    "I'm looking forward to the new season of Line of Duty..."

    Language is a moving feast and changes constantly. Grammar, nouns, verbs, phrases and meanings are all subject to change. Misspellings can become the standard version (and as to what spellings became the standard version in the first place is another story altogether). Some Americanisms (such as 'gotten') may grate with us are old English words we have since dispensed with. Grammatical rules we learned at school were often the results of academics trying to shoe-horn Latinisms on our Germanic language (which is heavily laced with vocabulary inherited from our Norman conquerors, of course). Plurals used to be expressed in different ways in different parts of the country, depending on linguistic influences in the regions concerned.
    Change is the norm regarding language. Best roll with it and see it as part of the same continuum that spawned the English Language in the first place.

    Consider where each of the words you just used came from: mostly German and partly French.

  3. #3

    Re: People using "Americanisms"

    Quote Originally Posted by Taunton Blue Genie View Post
    Language is a moving feast and changes constantly. Grammar, nouns, verbs, phrases and meanings are all subject to change. Misspellings can become the standard version (and as to what spellings became the standard version in the first place is another story altogether). Some Americanisms (such as 'gotten') may grate with us are old English words we have since dispensed with. Grammatical rules we learned at school were often the results of academics trying to shoe-horn Latinisms on our Germanic language (which is heavily laced with vocabulary inherited from our Norman conquerors, of course). Plurals used to be expressed in different ways in different parts of the country, depending on linguistic influences in the regions concerned.
    Change is the norm regarding language. Best roll with it and see it as part of the same continuum that spawned the English Language in the first place.

    Consider where each of the words you just used came from: mostly German and partly French.
    Well you just painted him all over the walls, I guess this thread's over

  4. #4

    Re: People using "Americanisms"

    Quote Originally Posted by delmbox View Post
    Well you just painted him all over the walls, I guess this thread's over
    Apologies, I didn't mean to make anyone feel small. Language fascinates me and I got carried away

  5. #5

    Re: People using "Americanisms"

    Quote Originally Posted by Taunton Blue Genie View Post
    Apologies, I didn't mean to make anyone feel small. Language fascinates me and I got carried away
    I was only teasing, you're right in your point though. Language is constantly evolving, as grating as some new developments in language can be they're basically the modern equivalent of not saying thee and thou etc anymore

  6. #6

    Re: People using "Americanisms"

    Quote Originally Posted by Taunton Blue Genie View Post
    Apologies, I didn't mean to make anyone feel small. Language fascinates me and I got carried away
    Accents fascinate me, although i don't have a great deal of knowledge on how and why. It fascinates me on how i can drive from the top of Thornhill and come down the other side of a big hill, no more that a mile or so, and the accent changes. Maybe it's because of that big hill!

  7. #7

    Re: People using "Americanisms"

    assists

    What the feck is all that about ?

    Premier league cobblers

  8. #8

    Re: People using "Americanisms"

    Quote Originally Posted by Tuerto View Post
    Accents fascinate me, although i don't have a great deal of knowledge on how and why. It fascinates me on how i can drive from the top of Thornhill and come down the other side of a big hill, no more that a mile or so, and the accent changes. Maybe it's because of that big hill!
    I will try and avoid making this particular contribution a sermon as well but accents and dialect are incredibly fascinating. It's only centralised power in the way of governments/regimes that declare one particular version as the standard and which is usually considered 'posh' thereafter. The diversity of language and languages is an absolute joy but I'll shut up now

  9. #9

    Re: People using "Americanisms"

    Quote Originally Posted by SLUDGE FACTORY View Post
    assists

    What the feck is all that about ?

    Premier league cobblers
    Yup, that's just bullshit. It's 'Setting Up'

  10. #10

    Re: People using "Americanisms"

    Quote Originally Posted by Tuerto View Post
    Yup, that's just bullshit. It's 'Setting Up'
    offense

    When they start using that is when I start taking the pills

  11. #11

    Re: People using "Americanisms"

    Quote Originally Posted by SLUDGE FACTORY View Post
    assists

    What the feck is all that about ?

    Premier league cobblers
    The concept had existed in ice hockey for a very long time, I believe. On the one hand I don't like it as it's alien to me (and that concept may sound familiar) but on the other hand I can understand that someone who sets up a lot of goals is recognised as being of particular value.

  12. #12

    Re: People using "Americanisms"

    Quote Originally Posted by Taunton Blue Genie View Post
    I will try and avoid making this particular contribution a sermon as well but accents and dialect are incredibly fascinating. It's only centralised power in the way of governments/regimes that declare one particular version as the standard and which is usually considered 'posh' thereafter. The diversity of language and languages is an absolute joy but I'll shut up now
    'Sermon' away, i might learn something Port Cities in the UK have some incredible dialect, Liverpool, Newcastle, Cardiff, Portsmouth etc. In land, where there is agriculture, it's less aggressive, almost sleepy. I wonder if the actual built environment forms an accent.

  13. #13

    Re: People using "Americanisms"

    Quote Originally Posted by Tuerto View Post
    'Sermon' away, i might learn something Port Cities in the UK have some incredible dialect, Liverpool, Newcastle, Cardiff, Portsmouth etc. In land, where there is agriculture, it's less aggressive, almost sleepy. I wonder if the actual built environment forms an accent.
    Or Landscape.

  14. #14

    Re: People using "Americanisms"

    Quote Originally Posted by SLUDGE FACTORY View Post
    offense

    When they start using that is when I start taking the pills
    Late 14th century English, old fruit.

  15. #15
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    Re: People using "Americanisms"

    Quote Originally Posted by Tuerto View Post
    'Sermon' away, i might learn something Port Cities in the UK have some incredible dialect, Liverpool, Newcastle, Cardiff, Portsmouth etc. In land, where there is agriculture, it's less aggressive, almost sleepy. I wonder if the actual built environment forms an accent.
    For years so called language experts refused to accept they way Londoners speak as an accent or dialect but it is. People tend to forget too the fact that the port of London and London docks were massive for centuries with all the differing nationals and accents that brings. A couple of hundred years ago there were so many ships trying to unload in the pool that it was said you could walk from one side of the pool of London to the other from ship to ship without getting your feet wet.

  16. #16

    Re: People using "Americanisms"

    Quote Originally Posted by xsnaggle View Post
    For years so called language experts refused to accept they way Londoners speak as an accent or dialect but it is. People tend to forget too the fact that the port of London and London docks were massive for centuries with all the differing nationals and accents that brings. A couple of hundred years ago there were so many ships trying to unload in the pool that it was said you could walk from one side of the pool of London to the other from ship to ship without getting your feet wet.
    What language experts are you referring to? They sound pretty dopey to me and not very 'expert' - as a dialect is particular form of a language which is peculiar to a specific region or social group. Not David Crystal, I'm sure!

  17. #17
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    Re: People using "Americanisms"

    Quote Originally Posted by Taunton Blue Genie View Post
    What language experts are you referring to? They sound pretty dopey to me and not very 'expert' - as a dialect is particular form of a language which is peculiar to a specific region or social group. Not David Crystal, I'm sure!
    I listened to a discussion on the subject many years ago, with these people saying the cornish or the geordie speech was dialectic but london wasn't. I never agreed with it. I have known londoners all over the world in my time and their manner of speaking is equally as identifiable as any other english.

  18. #18

    Re: People using "Americanisms"

    Quote Originally Posted by xsnaggle View Post
    I listened to a discussion on the subject many years ago, with these people saying the cornish or the geordie speech was dialectic but london wasn't. I never agreed with it. I have known londoners all over the world in my time and their manner of speaking is equally as identifiable as any other english.
    Many linguistic terms (e.g. language, dialect, accent) can't easily be defined 100% as they are part of a linguistic spectrum and/or continuum. Dogmatism and language don't always mix well.

  19. #19

    Re: People using "Americanisms"

    Quote Originally Posted by Taunton Blue Genie View Post
    Many linguistic terms (e.g. language, dialect, accent) can't easily be defined 100% as they are part of a linguistic spectrum and/or continuum. Dogmatism and language don't always mix well.
    Here's one for you. Why do Scandinavians seem to have the ability to speak English very well and even pick up the local accent?

  20. #20

    Re: People using "Americanisms"

    Pi$$ed being used for fed up rather than drunk is wrong.

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