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Thread: WFH

  1. #41

    Re: WFH

    Quote Originally Posted by North Cardiff Blue View Post
    Agreed a hybrid model is best for most people.

    I've worked both office based and home based jobs for years, if you're home you can work three long days rather than five or you can work straight away at six in the morning in the summer and enjoy an early finish, later start in the winter, pinch a Friday off whatever you want.

    As long as the works done to a good standard why should anyone mind?

    I think there is a bit of jealousy from those that canít work from home or find it hard too, donít worry about what other people do, just worry about yourself and what you can influence and control
    Hybrid works well for me.
    2 days home on monday and friday with 3 at the office in between is perfect for me really.

    WFH and Hybrid casts the net a lot further when it comes to recruitment and getting talent in from other areas where a 5 days at the office commute wouldnít be possible.

  2. #42

    Re: WFH

    Quote Originally Posted by JamesWales View Post
    I think it's been a total nightmare for both and things are generally much harder - simple tasks take much longer, understanding of issues is far less and generally people don't know what eachother are doing.
    That's not a WFH issue. My team is spread out across three continents and multiple time zones, and we serve internal stakeholders all over the globe. With the right tools, defined workflow processes, and proactive management, none of those things should be a problem. Although, of course, I do understand that various industries operate differently.

    At the end of the day, we all have different priorities and needs. What doesn't work for you is a godsend for some, and vice versa.

    For what it's worth, I get to pick my son up from school every day. The hour I would have otherwise spent in traffic now allows me to go for a walk every night instead. I can work from home, from cafes, from my parents house back in the UK... my life is so much more flexible than it was before. I don't see how any of those things are detrimental to my mental health.

  3. #43

    Re: WFH

    If you arenít pulling your wait at home, surely it will catch up with you clearly enough when the boss does their job and monitors whatís going on?

  4. #44

    Re: WFH

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Blue View Post
    If you aren’t pulling your wait at home, surely it will catch up with you clearly enough when the boss does their job and monitors what’s going on?
    Yeah, I don't know who these people are that are just lounging around all day.

    If anything, WFH means it's harder to find the end point of your working day or get a proper lunch.

  5. #45

    Re: WFH

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric the Half a Bee View Post
    I wish some would accept that certain working conditions suit different people.

    Mrs HaB works 3 days a week and does 2 from home. She saves 2 days' rail fare and gains 5 hours a werk that would have been wasted commuting. If she needs to work late it's not a problem, whereas working late in the office creates problems with her being home late. If times are busy she has voluntarily worked extra on a day off to clear a backlog, without pay, something she wouldn't do if she had to pay and commute for the privilige. She doesn't have to be pleasant with workers she wouldn't normally bother with. She doesn't have to do lunch or bother with office parties that she hates. She has some flexibility as well, for example on Wednesday it is my son's sports day. She can go for an hour if she's working from home and make up the time. She'd have to take a morning off otherwise.
    Just to say that the bit about voluntarily working without pay on what should have been a day off struck a chord with me, I'm not saying it happened very often with me, but there was the occasional Saturday or Sunday morning, or booked day's leave where I would work for an hour or two early in the morning without pay if the office was busy - if there are two of us who did that, then you have to think that there are plenty of others around the country who'd do the same from time to time. It's human nature to concentrate on the bad apples that take advantage of something, but I've always thought that there are more who would not abuse something like home working.

  6. #46

    Re: WFH

    Our work wants us to do 2-3 days a week or more if you wish in the office with one of them being a “team day”. They seem keen on it and really pushing the positive feedback but the vast majority of staff would prefer to do 1 day team day. We are only a small team so I get the team day but the other day seems pointless, quite often sitting on my own in a big office or with one colleague.

  7. #47

    Re: WFH

    Massive implications for outlets (food, drink etc) in commercial areas. People going out to work keep the wheels turning not just of their workplace but of society as a whole. It’s a dilemma that does need solving, could lead to ghost towns.

  8. #48

    Re: WFH

    Quote Originally Posted by splott parker View Post
    Massive implications for outlets (food, drink etc) in commercial areas. People going out to work keep the wheels turning not just of their workplace but of society as a whole. It’s a dilemma that does need solving, could lead to ghost towns.
    And? Forcing people back to work full time so they can spend more of their time commuting and money on keeping a sandwich shop going isn't going to be an easy sell.

  9. #49

    Re: WFH

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric the Half a Bee View Post
    And? Forcing people back to work full time so they can spend more of their time commuting and money on keeping a sandwich shop going isn't going to be an easy sell.
    Rather a strong word ‘forcing’. The collapse of small shops/businesses is a sad thing, it’s something that’s happened before in mining communities, areas around, now closed, steelworks etc. Shouldn’t these people be taken into consideration?

  10. #50

    Re: WFH

    Quote Originally Posted by splott parker View Post
    Massive implications for outlets (food, drink etc) in commercial areas. People going out to work keep the wheels turning not just of their workplace but of society as a whole. It’s a dilemma that does need solving, could lead to ghost towns.
    And what about all the businesses in suburban high streets like Rhiwbina, Whitchurch, Llanishen, Canton, Roath, etc and the likes of Albany Road, City Road and Cowbridge Road East? They certainly seem busier now on a weekday during working hours than they were pre Covid. I’d prefer to see the likes of Pret, Costa, Starbucks, etc suffer than the smaller, local places that make up the suburban high streets.

  11. #51

    Re: WFH

    Quote Originally Posted by splott parker View Post
    Rather a strong word ‘forcing’. The collapse of small shops/businesses is a sad thing, it’s something that’s happened before in mining communities, areas around, now closed, steelworks etc. Shouldn’t these people be taken into consideration?
    On the other hand working from home I've gone out with the mrs for lunch a few times near the house , thereby supporting the local businesses there. And a lot more pleasant than buying a baguete and a steak bake from a Greggs on a business park and eating it in my car before trudging back to the office.
    In terms of quality of life, lunchtimes are much better for me at home. Kids are in school, on a nice day can take a stroll to sonewhere nearby and have a nice meal with the mrs - take a long lunch maybe European style and just work it back later.
    If we have to choose to support places to eat near where we live or places to eat near the office I'd definitely prefer ones near where I live.

  12. #52

    Re: WFH

    Quote Originally Posted by splott parker View Post
    Rather a strong word ‘forcing’. The collapse of small shops/businesses is a sad thing, it’s something that’s happened before in mining communities, areas around, now closed, steelworks etc. Shouldn’t these people be taken into consideration?
    Like everything there will be winners and losers. Yes, it's sad when people lose their jobs, but there are no shortage of similar jobs just in different locations. I concur with replies from Canton Kev and Rjk.

    If I take my wife's situation, it would cost her £400 and 75 hours a year just to commute somewhere to help keep a sandwich shop open.

  13. #53

    Re: WFH

    Yes, as with any change, there are winners and losers. I think with 'mass WFH' though, we are generally seeing the winners being those further in their careers, those with more comfortable home lives and those with more comfortable homes in nicer areas being the winners and those who are perhaps more vulnerable or with less suitable home lives and younger in their careers being the losers. There is an increasing amount of stuff about how it is fuelling inequalities. It's one thing if you live in a big house in Whitchurch, quite another if you are in a flat in Trowbridge. It makes us mix less as a society, and I'm not sure thats good.

    This from the Resolution Foundation
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...concludes.html

    This from the guardian
    https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...nequalities-uk

    This from BUPA
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...rs-tackle.html

    There's also longer term impacts - how many of our friendships we enjoy were fostered through shared work environments? A great deal I suspect. What happens if they aren't allowed to develop? Is that fair on younger people? Are we burning less calories as a society? Are we using more carbon to heat individual homes? Will younger people develop less social skills? What are the mental health impacts? Who suffers when public transport is withdrawn? Are there issues with burnout?

    Lot's to unpack, very difficult to extract it from the pandemic itself and of course everything impacts people differently, but I think we all have a social duty as well as one to our families so it's an important thing to keep an eye on.

  14. #54

    Re: WFH

    Almost every issue youíve mentioned is caused by lockdowns not flexible working locations.

    1/5 of people exercising less? What about the other 4/5s? Exercising more?

  15. #55

    Re: WFH

    Quote Originally Posted by JamesWales View Post
    Yes, as with any change, there are winners and losers. I think with 'mass WFH' though, we are generally seeing the winners being those further in their careers, those with more comfortable home lives and those with more comfortable homes in nicer areas being the winners and those who are perhaps more vulnerable or with less suitable home lives and younger in their careers being the losers. There is an increasing amount of stuff about how it is fuelling inequalities. It's one thing if you live in a big house in Whitchurch, quite another if you are in a flat in Trowbridge. It makes us mix less as a society, and I'm not sure thats good.

    .
    A very valid point and of course social interaction is what makes Humans special, we show compassion to others, we share and experience the highs and lows with others and are normally pretty decent about it, I am sure some will argue " but I get my social interaction from spending time with Friends " ( sitting on CCMB "calling out" JamesWales for something you disagree with and being Joined with 3 or 4 others to back you up ( one being your own multi ), isnt interaction with friends, honestly, its not

    Quote Originally Posted by JamesWales View Post
    There's also longer term impacts - how many of our friendships we enjoy were fostered through shared work environments? A great deal I suspect. What happens if they aren't allowed to develop? Is that fair on younger people? Are we burning less calories as a society? Are we using more carbon to heat individual homes? Will younger people develop less social skills? What are the mental health impacts? Who suffers when public transport is withdrawn? Are there issues with burnout?

    .
    Every argument I see online from WFH'ers are just selfish reasons, Oh I can save fuel money / Lunch Money / I save 2 hours per day ( though FormerlyJohnnyBreadhead comes up with a decent reason, he gets to do the school run, from my humble point of view, and speaking from someone who has been fortunate to do it 4 out of 5 days, its great time spent with your children

  16. #56

    Re: WFH

    I wonder if a bitter cold winter will tempt office workers back to the workplace? Gas & electric bills are astronomical as it is, having your own heating on and kettle boiling frequently could add to them considerably. Then again I don’t know why I got involved in this thread, I work outside, I’m cree

  17. #57

    Re: WFH

    The WFHís have such selfish reasons like having a much nicer life!

  18. #58

    Re: WFH

    Quote Originally Posted by blue matt View Post
    A very valid point and of course social interaction is what makes Humans special, we show compassion to others, we share and experience the highs and lows with others and are normally pretty decent about it, I am sure some will argue " but I get my social interaction from spending time with Friends " ( sitting on CCMB "calling out" JamesWales for something you disagree with and being Joined with 3 or 4 others to back you up ( one being your own multi ), isnt interaction with friends, honestly, its not



    Every argument I see online from WFH'ers are just selfish reasons, Oh I can save fuel money / Lunch Money / I save 2 hours per day ( though FormerlyJohnnyBreadhead comes up with a decent reason, he gets to do the school run, from my humble point of view, and speaking from someone who has been fortunate to do it 4 out of 5 days, its great time spent with your children
    I'm not seeing how those are selfish reasons. You could say they're altruistic; reducing pollution, reducing the number of cars on the road, reducing costs for businesses, putting more money into the local economy etc.

  19. #59

    Re: WFH

    Quote Originally Posted by splott parker View Post
    Rather a strong word Ďforcingí. The collapse of small shops/businesses is a sad thing, itís something thatís happened before in mining communities, areas around, now closed, steelworks etc. Shouldnít these people be taken into consideration?
    The supply chain has moved not really disappeared, by my office or by my home. I still buy lunch 3 times a week to save time, i meet friends for a coffee or beer locally rather then by the office. I would say in Cardiff those small "villages" in Whitchurch or Llandaff might get a lease of life rather than Greggs on the Queen Street.

    Are there any small business' left in the centre?

  20. #60

    Re: WFH

    Quote Originally Posted by splott parker View Post
    Massive implications for outlets (food, drink etc) in commercial areas. People going out to work keep the wheels turning not just of their workplace but of society as a whole. Itís a dilemma that does need solving, could lead to ghost towns.
    It just moves from towns to villages, Rhiwbina now has a coffee lab, Groker food place with licence, and the Rhiwbina tap, plus the Deri Butchers and Nine giants are doing more daytime stuff, the village was dead now thriving.
    Probably the same all over Cardff, people don't need to go to the City Centre and Drakefords doesn't want it, he's making it as difficult as possible.

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