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Thread: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

  1. #1

    Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    With "Neuralink" and other similar advances causing plenty of debate, it seems certain that we are heading towards a future of chips with everything, even us.
    Today, more than 50,000 people have elected to have a subdermal chip surgically inserted between the thumb and index finger, serve as their new swipe key, or credit card. In Germany, for example, more than 2,000 Germans have opted to receive these implants; one man even used it to store a link to his last will and testament (article).

    As we get used to paying with our phone, our watches and other wireless methods, the world has changed so much even in the last five years; ancient writings (from AD90) spoke of a time when the hand and the head would become THE means of all transactions, so was the writing already written 'on the wall' - and if this is the fulfilment of chapter 13 of Revelation (the last book of the Bible), then where is this all leading?

  2. #2

    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    Microchip implants Ė the wallet of tomorrow?

    Potential users
    What is the target group for the implant? A 2021 survey conducted as part of the European Payments Landscape 2030 report found that 51% of consumers in Europe would consider having a payment microchip implanted in their hand if it met certain criteria, particularly around safety and privacy issues. The survey also revealed that the most positive reactions to the technology were from respondents between 18 and 24 years of age. This may lead to the conclusion that the new wave of contactless payments will be spearheaded by Generation Z, typically defined as people born from 1997 to 2012, who have grown up with access to the internet and portable digital technology from an early age - RedCompass Labs

  3. #3

    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    All part of the Brave New World that's coming I suppose. I won't be around to see it but I worry for my grandchildren of course. As I approach my 80th in a few years time (God willing!) I am so grateful that I was born and grew up in the immediate post-war era that I did. A much simpler, uncomplicated time, a time full of hope and optimism for the future.

  4. #4

    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gofer Blue View Post
    All part of the Brave New World that's coming I suppose. I won't be around to see it but I worry for my grandchildren of course. As I approach my 80th in a few years time (God willing!) I am so grateful that I was born and grew up in the immediate post-war era that I did. A much simpler, uncomplicated time, a time full of hope and optimism for the future.
    I'm half your age more or less, and increasingly jealous of people who grew up at such a time.

  5. #5

    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    Quote Originally Posted by JamesWales View Post
    I'm half your age more or less, and increasingly jealous of people who grew up at such a time.
    I think the golden lifespan was being born around 1950 and dying just before Covid hit. Free university education, apprenticeships, experiencing the relative liberation of youth in the 60s, the associated music of that period, easy access to mortgages (and when endowment mortgages were profitable in the main) and easier access to major sporting occasions (before they were considered to be fashionable), less surveillance, a state retirement age at 60 etc.
    Of course there were drawbacks such as recessions, negative equity, lower life expectancy, limited choice, less car ownership, more sexism and a lot else - but it wasn't a bad timeslot in general.

  6. #6

    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    Quote Originally Posted by JamesWales View Post
    I'm half your age more or less, and increasingly jealous of people who grew up at such a time.
    Although it wasn't my fault that I was born in the 1940's, I do feel a certain guilt when I look around and see the situation facing the millenial generation today. TBG's response sums up it very well. University education was free in the 60's but of course far fewer youngsters went to university back then. I was the first in the whole of my extended family to do so and was very grateful for the opportunity. We didn't have a car and I used my bike to go places, being a lot fitter then - maybe that's how I have survived this long! No home telephone either - yet we managed somehow. When I was in uni in London my girl friend had to go to the local phone box near her house, book a "trunk call", wait a while for the operator to call her back (meanwhile hoping and praying that no-one else would come along to use the phone box) and put her through to the phone in the hall of residence where I was. Of course I had to hope that no-one else was using that phone either, but it all worked out well most times. Letter writing of course was the norm.

    It has been said that every generation believes that it had the best music when they were young but, and you know what I am going to say of course, the 60's was a very special time in that regard. Yes there were quite a few "one-hit wonders" but a lot of the music is timeless, easy to sing along to, and whistle along to (which is the acid test I think!).

    It has been said that if you remember the 60's you weren't really there, such was the drug scene (LSD especially) and the free love culture at the time. As a conscientious pharmacy student these things passed me by, so I can say I well and truly remember the 60's!

  7. #7

    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Taunton Blue Genie View Post
    I think the golden lifespan was being born around 1950 and dying just before Covid hit. Free university education, apprenticeships, experiencing the relative liberation of youth in the 60s, the associated music of that period, easy access to mortgages (and when endowment mortgages were profitable in the main) and easier access to major sporting occasions (before they were considered to be fashionable), less surveillance, a state retirement age at 60 etc.
    Of course there were drawbacks such as recessions, negative equity, lower life expectancy, limited choice, less car ownership, more sexism and a lot else - but it wasn't a bad timeslot in general.
    Pretty well spot on there with your summary!

    I didn't do very well on the mortgage front as I didn't get married until the early 70's by which time property prices had sky rocketed in Essex where we living at the time so we could not get a mortgage, so we rented a flat. When we moved back to Wales prices here had gone up too but not so much, so I was able to borrow 4.5 x my salary which was unheard of then! Mind you the interest rate was around 15 - 17% at the time.....!

    It was a much more innocent time then somehow - maybe it's the rose-tinted glasses effect but for example I was never afraid to walk anywhere in London at night when I was a student. Thankfully there was no "social media" which although it has some benefits, on balance I believe it is a curse rather than a blessing and does not bode well for the next generation i.e. my grandchildrens'. How I would have loved a mobile phone though, to keep in touch with my girlfriend who was so far away.

  8. #8

    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    Got to laugh. Things were so much better in the day. Moaning about Social Media on Social Media on a device unheard of during the 50s.😂😂😂

    Switch off the TV , phone , ration the food , tune into the wireless may cheer you all up.

    You will all be nostalgic for outdoor toilets next.

    Post war Britain sounds a pretty grim place.

  9. #9

    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Taunton Blue Genie View Post
    I think the golden lifespan was being born around 1950 and dying just before Covid hit. Free university education, apprenticeships, experiencing the relative liberation of youth in the 60s, the associated music of that period, easy access to mortgages (and when endowment mortgages were profitable in the main) and easier access to major sporting occasions (before they were considered to be fashionable), less surveillance, a state retirement age at 60 etc.
    Of course there were drawbacks such as recessions, negative equity, lower life expectancy, limited choice, less car ownership, more sexism and a lot else - but it wasn't a bad timeslot in general.
    My youngest is 36 and he reckons 'our' time[s] was the best. Not financially, but just the way we worked, lived our lives and the total lack of neurosis and anxiety that seems to permeate every ounce of modern society. There's a chap and his Mrs over the road from me who have worked from home since Covid. His highlight is the morning walk to the shop to return with 2 polystyrene cups of coffee. They never go out, Tesco deliver their shopping, and order everything via Amazon. He probably thinks he's living the dream.

  10. #10

    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hilts View Post
    Got to laugh. Things were so much better in the day. Moaning about Social Media on Social Media on a device unheard of during the 50s.������

    Switch off the TV , phone , ration the food , tune into the wireless may cheer you all up.

    You will all be nostalgic for outdoor toilets next.

    Post war Britain sounds a pretty grim place.
    It's not about things 'being better in the day' as my own personal timeslot doesn't quite align with that which I wrote about.
    However, I think young people of today have it really tough in many ways. Peer pressure, a very competitive employment market, university loans, unaffordable house market, the possible need to change their type of employment more frequently and a number of global issues that are likely to affect them in many ways, including climate change. Many of them have endured a period of Lockdown that may have disrupted their education and development of social skills etc. The possibility of working abroad has contracted and travelling in general may attract a greater stigma than in previous decades.
    There are always positives, of course - but if your lifespan was, say, 75 years, which decades do you think it would have been best to straddle?

  11. #11

    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Taunton Blue Genie View Post
    It's not about things 'being better in the day' as my own personal timeslot doesn't quite align with that which I wrote about.
    However, I think young people of today have it really tough in many ways. Peer pressure, a very competitive employment market, university loans, unaffordable house market, the possible need to change their type of employment more frequently and a number of global issues that are likely to affect them in many ways, including climate change. Many of them have endured a period of Lockdown that may have disrupted their education and development of social skills etc. The possibility of working abroad has contracted and travelling in general may attract a greater stigma than in previous decades.
    There are always positives, of course - but if your lifespan was, say, 75 years, which decades do you think it would have been best to straddle?
    To answer that final question then I would say 1949 - 2024:-

    1. To see in the 1950's, which many say was the finest decade of recent history.
    2. To be on the verge of my teenage years as the timeless music of the 60's was unfolding.
    3. To see the start of technology at home and some great memories at Ninian Park in the 70's.
    4. To experience the boom in business opportunities as the 20th century arrived at it's last two decades.
    5. To hear and see how people reacted when the world changed on and after 11th September 2001.
    6. To see the entire reign of our Queen, a stunning example to us all and a genuine 24/7 Christian.
    7. To see people change through and after the Worldwide Pandemic, with the way we all do life looking like it has changed forever.

  12. #12

    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    Nah your not convincing me.

    Restrictions on movement where a large amount is as a result of the oldies of that period.

    Oldies who look out their windows watching their neighbours lives as they mind their own business getting their morning coffee.😂😂

    Your teenage years you needed to be drugged out of your mind on LSD as there was feck all else to do.

    The oldies have a lot to answer for.😂

  13. #13

    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hilts View Post
    Nah your not convincing me.

    Restrictions on movement where a large amount is as a result of the oldies of that period.

    Oldies who look out their windows watching their neighbours lives as they mind their own business getting their morning coffee.����

    Your teenage years you needed to be drugged out of your mind on LSD as there was feck all else to do.

    The oldies have a lot to answer for.��
    From your comments, I presume you are not of my generation and therefore don't have first hand knowledge of the 50's or 60's. If so, you will have no idea of what life was actually like back then. Be thankful that most of the miserable old baby-boomers, that you seem to think are to blame for all the current ills in society, won't be around much longer so you can enjoy your brave new technological world all by yourselves!

  14. #14

    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gofer Blue View Post
    From your comments, I presume you are not of my generation and therefore don't have first hand knowledge of the 50's or 60's. If so, you will have no idea of what life was actually like back then. Be thankful that most of the miserable old baby-boomers, that you seem to think are to blame for all the current ills in society, won't be around much longer so you can enjoy your brave new technological world all by yourselves!
    In the meantime keep telling us all how much better things were without all this technology on the technology which is so bad.😂😂😂

  15. #15

    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hilts View Post
    In the meantime keep telling us all how much better things were without all this technology on the technology which is so bad.😂😂😂
    There is nothing wrong with technology per se. The scary thing for me is the ever increasing reliance on it and the consequences when things go wrong, as we witnessed recently. I am reminded of the statement that we, i.e. society, are just 6 meals away from total anarchy. You mock me for complaining about social media whilst using social media - fair enough but I am not a vulnerable teenager for whom the consequences of on-line abuse are much more serious. I am of an age where I couldn't give a proverbial monkeys (other expressions are available) what others say to me!

  16. #16

    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gofer Blue View Post
    There is nothing wrong with technology per se. The scary thing for me is the ever increasing reliance on it and the consequences when things go wrong, as we witnessed recently. I am reminded of the statement that we, i.e. society, are just 6 meals away from total anarchy. You mock me for complaining about social media whilst using social media - fair enough but I am not a vulnerable teenager for whom the consequences of on-line abuse are much more serious. I am of an age where I couldn't give a proverbial monkeys (other expressions are available) what others say to me!
    Technology itself is not a problem, it's how you use it. Read any book on propaganda or totalitarianism, and you will understand why certain power structures are drawn to it.

  17. #17
    International Mrs Steve R's Avatar
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    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    It's a no from me


    Hello strangers, hope you are all good

  18. #18

    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs Steve R View Post
    It's a no from me


    Hello strangers, hope you are all good
    Have you come here to piss on our chips?

  19. #19
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    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Wales-Bales View Post
    Have you come here to piss on our chips?


    Got a day off so I thought I'd pop in.

  20. #20

    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs Steve R View Post


    Got a day off so I thought I'd pop in.
    You should pop in more often

  21. #21
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    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs Steve R View Post


    Got a day off so I thought I'd pop in.
    You didnít give BiggusDikus a lift did you?

    That would be carnage - but funny!

  22. #22
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    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Wales-Bales View Post
    You should pop in more often
    I will do

    Quote Originally Posted by jon1959 View Post
    You didnít give BiggusDikus a lift did you?

    That would be carnage - but funny!
    He's so obsessed I thought he was already here

  23. #23

    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs Steve R View Post
    It's a no from me


    Hello strangers, hope you are all good
    Are you and Butlins DJ boy still in the same location ?

  24. #24
    International Mrs Steve R's Avatar
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    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    Quote Originally Posted by SLUDGE FACTORY View Post
    Are you and Butlins DJ boy still in the same location ?
    Hardly, Steve is working 7 days a week.

  25. #25

    Re: Microchips in Humans - was this always going to happen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs Steve R View Post
    Hardly, Steve is working 7 days a week.
    As in your house ?

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